Fauci Furious After Court Steps In, Here’s Where He Thinks CDC Should Be on the Hierarchy


Commentary

Dr. Anthony Fauci testifying before a Senate committee

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and chief medical adviser to the president, testifies before a Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee hearing, Jan. 11, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. (Greg Nash / Pool via AP)

 By Mike Landry  April 22, 2022 at 5:41pm

Disagreeing with a court ruling freeing public transportation passengers from required masking, Anthony Fauci this week revealed perhaps a bit more than he intended.

Courts should not have a say on public health issues; only government agencies like the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention should, according to Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

What’s that, doctor? The CDC, your organization, the Biden administration and even the lowliest county health office is above the law?

Is that what you’re saying, Dr. Fauci?

“Both surprised and disappointed,” was Fauci’s reaction to Monday’s ruling by U.S. District Judge Kathryn Kimball Mizelle that lifted the transportation mask mandates. “Because those types of things really are the purview of the CDC.”

“This is a public health issue,” Fauci told CNN’s Kasie Hunt. “And for a court to come in, and if you look at the rationale for that, it’s not really particularly firm.

“And we are concerned about that, about court’s getting involved in things that are unequivocally public health decision[s], I mean this is a CDC issue, it should not have been a court issue.”

WATCH: Dr. Fauci tells me on #TheSourceKasie🕵🏻‍♀️ “This is a CDC issue, it should not have been a court issue.” @CNN pic.twitter.com/rZZyHnFqJ5

— Kasie Hunt (@kasie) April 21, 2022

So public health agencies reign, right? Fauci already has equated himself with science and now is essentially saying agencies like the CDC are not to be questioned.

Is Dr. Fauci showing he believes public health officials are above the law?

When a federal court examines evidence regarding the legality of a specific health mandate, it is not only within its rights but also doing its duty since it is reviewing not issues of science, but issues of public policy driven by the scientific community.

Which is exactly what Mizelle did — her ruling had to do with the CDC acting outside its authority, failing to solicit public comment and neglecting to explain its decisions, Reuters reported. Our government was established with checks and balances, including the concept of due process, and it’s on that basis that Mizelle formed her ruling.

The question is whether Fauci simply demonstrated ignorance of legal procedures or expressed ire because his desire for control over the daily lives of everyday Americans by public health officials was frustrated.

The CDC indicated the transportation mask mandate would be reviewed and possibly abolished by May 3, about two weeks after Mizelle ruled.

The issue, according to Fauci’s logic, is one of jurisdiction — who has authority to end a mask mandate, public health officials or the courts?

Ironically, that placed Fauci squarely in Mizelle’s territory, as she made a ruling on due process, with little attention to the underlying science, which would involve questions Fauci and his colleagues would be more qualified to address — though it should be added that their credibility has taken a serious hit over the past couple of years.

The ongoing dictatorial behavior of the CDC and officials like Fauci during the course of the COVID pandemic has undermined the faith of many in the administration of public health by largely unaccountable government bureaucrats.

It feels like the primary science followed by these unelected functionaries has been political science.

Mike Landry, PhD, is a retired business professor. He has been a journalist, broadcaster and church pastor. He writes from Northwest Arkansas on current events and business history.

Mike Landry, PhD, is a retired business professor. He has been a journalist, broadcaster and church pastor. He writes from Northwest Arkansas on current events and business history.

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